Questions About Circulation

Charles Malone's Questions About Circulation is a tender, powerful mediation on the geographies that define us, asking poignant questions about the environments we leave behind.

"How to extract 'wonder from sediment,' especially if the sediment is vaguely toxic? This is the central question of Charles Malone’s Questions About Circulation. One answer is to dig––the literal trace of land use, the lateral spread of material history, the billowing field of childhood memory. These poems brim with glacial moraine, crumbling mills, wild blackberry thickets, and 'a big peaceful cement pond [reflecting] tarnished copper.' But it is aftermath that concerns the present, and these poems haunt the body’s arterial connections: 'a vein is a way elsewhere, and part of a circuit.' Tracing our entanglements, Charles Malone’s Questions About Circulation returns us to the ground of our senses: 'and slow down/put the o in close the boy has flown.'"

— Matthew Cooperman, author of Spool "Questions About Circulation is vivid and visceral and palpable. All the perks of James Wright and Wendell Berry, and lyricism all his own. The work is somehow softly abrasive."

— Erica Dawson, author of When Rap Spoke Straight to God

Cover Artist: Nathaniel St. Amour

Cover Designer: Sally Franckowiak

Charles Malone grew up in rural Northeastern Ohio, headed west to the Rockies, came back to the Great Lakes, and has loved all of it. Charles now works at the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University coordinating community outreach programs. He edited the collection “A Poetic Inventory of Rocky Mountain National Park” with Wolverine Farm Publishing and has work recently published or forthcoming in Hotel Amerika, The Best of Boneshaker: A Bicycling Almanac, Saltfront, The Sugar House Review, and The Gordon Square Review. He lives in one of the most nurturing small towns for poets, Kent, Ohio.

BGJM Cover - Copy.tif

Poetry Chapbook

Genre

Release Date

03-26-2019

Page Count

35

978-1-949065-03-9

IBSN

$7.99

Price

Excerpts